Splendid Ankle Length Gold Embroidered Velvet Coat

There are some clothes that I can only describe as "splendid". My red and turquoise kimono-coat is one; this embroidered velvet coat is another. Again, I don't know its country of origin, though I've found images of similar-looking garments from Lebanon. But wherever it originated, I myself found it in the Age Concern charity shop on Cowley Road, about ten years ago.

Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat
Splendid ankle-length gold-embroidered velvet coat

One notable feature is the thread buttons. I've had these checked and sewn on more tightly where necessary, because they'd be very difficult to replace once lost.

Navy Blue Embroidered Velvet Coat

The weather is getting warmer, so I'm going to display one of my light coats. While it wouldn't do protection against the Beast From the East — that required this — it was perfect against today's blue-sky chill. The body is navy-blue velvet; in some lights, it has a slight purple cast, as on the right sleeve in the second photo below.

Dark blue embroidered velvet coat
Dark blue embroidered velvet coat
Dark blue embroidered velvet coat
Dark blue embroidered velvet coat
Dark blue embroidered velvet coat
Dark blue embroidered velvet coat

Splendid Red and Turquoise Kimono Coat

I was surprised at how well bright red and turquoise go together. This is a very unusual woollen coat. The sleeves are just over half-length, and there's something of the kimono in the way they hang. The ends of the sleeves, the pockets, and the body of the coat, have been embroidered in turquoise. There is no label, and I don't know where this would have been made. Was it made in Britain to an unusual design, or somewhere else where that shape would be more natural?

Splendid red full-length coat with turquoise embroidery
Splendid red full-length coat with turquoise embroidery
Splendid red full-length coat with turquoise embroidery
Splendid red full-length coat with turquoise embroidery

I took the photo last Friday. For February, the sun was unusually bright.

Hunkpapa Red Tailcoat

Oxford has many buskers. One of them used to play the saxophone. He was also a bodybuilder, and — so I'm told — would hire himself out to hen parties, where he would play the saxophone naked for a hundred quid or two. This post, however, is about busker costume, not the lack thereof. Coming back from the dry cleaners mentioned in my last post, I saw a band new to me performing in Cornmarket. Note the red coat:

They're called Hunkpapa, and a quick check of their Twitter account and gallery proves that they are indeed the people shown in my photos.

So, in fact, does the BBC Music NI site, which tells me they're a four-piece band from Armagh, here performing their short EP "Enemy". I didn't have time to listen to more than a few bars, but here's a review by Chantelle Frampton (16 March 2018) for giggingni.com of a gig in Limelight 2, BelfastWayback. They are, she writes, one of those bands that seemed to just pop up in the Northern Irish music scene and then they quickly took it by storm. Not only are their sets incredibly fun and energetic, but they also ensure their live shows are all varied and keep the crowd coming back for more.

The squalid building behind the band, by the way, is in Oxford. Yet another boarded-up shop. One would not, any more, describe Oxford as "whispering from her towers the last enchantments of the Middle Age". Home of lost causes, certainly, especially — when one is the council, or a college — that of pride in one's city.

Blue Heavy Cotton Sarouel

I've just been to the dry cleaners, and thought I'd show off what I had cleaned. This is a sarouel made for me a few years ago in Morocco. As with my silver silk-velvet sarouel, I bought the material from A-One Fabrics in Goldhawk Road, Shepherd's Bush. This time, it was several metres of heavy blue cotton, intended for wear during the colder half of the year.

I then took it back to Oxford, and had it washed and thoroughly dried at a local laundry, one accustomed to cleaning large quantities of bedding and other heavy fabric. I wanted to make sure that if the cotton did shrink, it would do so before it was made into trousers. Washing that much material at home would have been impractical, and drying it, even more so. I then had it taken to Tangier and made into trousers. I don't have a photo of them stretched out, but the shape is like that in the above post.

Blue heavy cotton sarouel
Blue heavy cotton sarouel

Red Purple and Black Velvet Jacket, Re-Dyed in Afghanistan

This jacket came from Fusion Fashion in Portobello Road London. I'm fairly sure they had two shops when I bought it, but I can only find the address of one: 242 Portobello Road, not far south from where the Westway crosses. The owner of the shop told me it was probably made in the UK as a conventional one-colour jacket, but then sent to Afghanistan to be re-dyed: in the 1970s, if I remember correctly. Apparently, that was trendy then.

Red, purple and black velvet jacket, re-dyed in Afghanistan
Red, purple and black velvet jacket, re-dyed in Afghanistan